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My Bike shop is very pleased and honored to work with Mr Brown and his travels again

October 28, 2012 Comments off

Mr Brown who worked with us and his crew partner brought a Bike Friday Tikit and Tern Link P9 to Taiwan travelled safely despite the Bike Friday Tikit Safety warning. Nonetheless we took steps to ensure that his bike was inspected and he is off AGAIN

Cross post from Mr Brown:

I am leaving for the U.S. next week to speak and meet up with overseas Singaporeans at Ann Arbor (Wednesday, 24th Oct), Chicago (Friday, 26th October) and Seattle (Saturday, 27th October). Click on the dates for details.

The Overseas Singaporean Unit also interviewed me for their website (where I stole this photo from). You can read it on their site.

I will also be doing some cycling in the three cities on my Bike Friday Tikit (thanks to sponsor My Bike Shop) and I will share my cycling experiences too.

See you all in America next week!

P.S. This is the SECOND time I’ve gone to the U.S. during an election. The last time I was there was Obama vs McCain during September/October 2008. Haha!

Ten lessons from the great cycling cities.

August 22, 2012 Comments off
Found another recent posts on great cycling cities. There are MANY examples from other cities, I hope the task force will look into these word class examples. many countries have got it righ!
Cross-posted from Sightline Daily.
In the Seattle suburb where I grew up, the main transportation choice most residents face is what kind of car to buy. I moved to the city after college and, inspired by the “car-lite” lifestyles of several friends, decided to give cycling a try.I fell in love with it. Urban cycling freed me from slow buses, parking meters, and mind-numbing elliptical machines. I arrived at work with more energy. I lost weight. I discovered charming neighborhood restaurants. I could smell fresh laundry and dinners in the oven while I pedaled home through residential streets. Getting from A to B on my bike became the best part of my day.Recently, I won a fellowship and got to spend six months living life on two wheels in the world’s most bike-friendly cities. I brought home 10 lessons for us here in the States:A bike lane in Denmark. (Photo by Christine Grant.)

1. It’s the infrastructure, stupid!

Amazing infrastructure makes cycling normal and safe in bike meccas. For example, parked cars to the left of the bike lane not only provide a barrier between motorized traffic and cyclists, they also minimize a cyclist’s chance of getting “doored.” Most cars only have one occupant, the driver, and drivers get out on the left.

Bikes move at different speeds than cars or pedestrians, so intersections are safer for cyclists if they have their own traffic signal rhythm. Cyclists in Copenhagen generally get a slight head start over cars so that they’ll be more visible as they cross the intersection.

2. Bike share!

Bike-share programs are sweeping the world, and they are very successful at boosting bike numbers.About 130,000 trips are made each day in Paris on public bikes thanks to the pioneering Vélib bike-share program.

Barcelona’s bike-share program has been wildly succesful at boosting ridership. (Photo by Christine Grant.)

In Barcelona, people used to point and stare if you were pedaling a bike, but in just a few years, a bike-share program called Bicing has changed that. Bicing started in 2007 and quickly tripled cycling trips in the city, according to Miquel Ruscalleda, who directs Barcelona’s cycling efforts. Currently 46 percent of the people you see on bikes in Barcelona are on bright red Bicing bikes.

Ruscalleda also reports that the “safety in numbers” phenomenon is working in his city. Cyclists had a .008 percent chance of being in a traffic accident in 2005, and the rate has dropped to around .005 percent presently.

3. It’s safer than a sofa.

Sedentary living doubles the risk of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and obesity. Combating diseases of sedentary living requires 30 minutes of moderate exercise every day — a minimum many people around the world are unable to meet. But almost 40 percent of Copenhagen residents meet their minimum exercise requirements by cycling to work or school.

Copenhagen’s Public Health Department calculates that even when accident costs are factored in, every mile of cycling translates to net health benefits worth $1.30. A recent public health campaign in Copenhagen reminded residents, “You’re safer on your bike than on the sofa!”

Barcelona’s bike counter. (Photo by Christine Grant.)

4. Say “thank you.”

Cyclists also save city governments money by reducing traffic congestion, stormwater run-off, air pollution, and road maintenance expenditures. Many cities are doing little things to show their gratitude.

Barcelona recently installed a counter on a main route displaying the time, temperature, bike count for the day, and progress toward the official annual ridership goal for that route.

Copenhagen has begun putting in footrests at intersections. They say, “Hi, cyclist! Rest your foot here … and thank you for cycling in the city!”

5. Turn streets into backyards.

Dutch road engineer Hans Monderman hated traffic signs in cities and towns. His reasoning was simple: Most drivers don’t look at signs. Speed bumps and stop signs also don’t do much because drivers are notorious for accelerating to “make up time” after each interruption.

Monderman redesigned Dutch towns so that drivers felt like they were passing through someone’s backyard. Monderman’s “backyard”plans called for street furniture — benches, picnic tables, sand boxes, pea patches, trees, flowerpots, and ping pong tables. Drivers either saw or sensed the presence of people and children, and basic social laws kicked in: It isn’t polite to speed through someone’s backyard.

Many residential streets throughout Europe now embody Monderman’s principles.

6. Let prices tell the truth.

Driving — and parking — is much more expensive in other parts of the world. Filling up a tank of gas in Japan will cost you about $7.25 per gallon, and gas prices in most European countries are also much higher than in the U.S.

Donald Shoup, an economist and the author of The High Cost of Free Parking says, “People who want to store their car shouldn’t store it on the most valuable land on the planet, for free.” Street parking is typically $4.50 per hour in European cities.

A woman in Kyoto bikes in heels. (Photo by Christine Grant.)

7. You don’t need “bike clothes.”

Most of the women and men I saw on bicycles throughout Europe and Japan didn’t wear special clothes. People just wore their usual outfits, heels and all.

Women from London to Tokyo looked beautiful, stylish, and feminine while they were cycling. Men frequently pedaled in suits. “Style over speed,” says Mikael Colville-Anderson, who started the Cycle Chic movement.

8. Electrify it.

A cargo bike with two kids and groceries can be hard to get up hills. That’s why many parents in hilly Zurich, Switzerland, use electric-assist bikes. They can also help people who are battling obesity or recovering from a heart attack. A bike shop owner I interviewed in Zurich makes custom electric-assist bicycles for disabled customers who would otherwise be dependent on public transportation.

For this mother and her daughters in Kyoto, biking is a family affair. (Photo by Christine Grant.)

9. Admit it: It’s emotional.

Smell and touch are the senses most linked to our emotions. In Europe and Japan, I spoke with dozens of urban cyclists who talked about the curious happiness derived from activating your senses and connecting with your city on a bicycle. One Amsterdam father’s voice actually cracked with emotion as he reflected on his morning and afternoon rides with his son. His toddler sat in a front-mounted childseat. The father talked about how nice it was to smell his son’s head during the commute to day care.

10. It’s a virtuous cycle.

“Cycling isn’t just a part of the Dutch DNA,” Marc van Woudenberg told me in Amsterdam, where 47 percent of residents make at least one trip per day on a bicycle.

The Dutch have the highest rates of utility cycling in the world because citizens have made it clear to politicians that cycling infrastructure is a priority. Better infrastructure recruits more people onto bikes, which creates more advocates for better infrastructure, which recruits more people onto bikes, and so on. Today, the Dutch continue to advocate for infrastructure that will facilitate cycling.

After six months on my bicycling wanderjahr, I’m inspired by all the creative ways cities are transforming themselves to meet the needs of the 21st century: low on carbon, high on physical activity, low on noise and danger, high on fun and style. Here in the U.S., we have exciting opportunities to join the world’s great bike cities and redefine urban transportation on two wheels.

Spokes – Spoken or Silent?

June 22, 2012 Comments off

Why Spokes Break

Bike spokes are a pretty simple part of your bike. They support your weight and transfer power from the hub to the wheel. Problems with spokes are pretty infrequent, but still do happen from time to time. The most common problem a cyclist will have with their spokes is the occasional broken spoke. This happened to me with some regularity as I’m what they used to call in boys’ jeans sizes, “husky.” You’ll just be going down the road and suddenly hear a noise like TWANGGG! (and it does sound like that). Even if you don’t hear the spoke break, you’ll likely feel it, because the your wheel will usually go all wobbly. Sometimes if you mash down particularly hard on the pedals or hit a pothole it can spur spoke breakage too, but usually it just kinda happens. Spokes break most frequently where the head of the spoke laces into the hub, because the curved head of the spoke is the weakest part and yet still has to bears a lot of the weight and force of power transfer. If you have this happen, stop, get off your bike and inspect your wheel. You want to make sure your spoke isn’t flopping around to where it can get entangled with your frame or chain as your wheel turns. To keep it secure, you can tape it to a neighbor or unscrew it from the nipple and remove it completely. You’re okay to ride it a bit longer if necessary to get home, but you don’t want another forty miles or continue riding days and days with a broken spoke if you can help it. It puts additional stress and strain on your other spokes (which can then cause them to break prematurely at some point down the road too) and can make your wheel go out of tru

How Spokes work?

How the spokes accomplish these terrific and heroic feats? First, spokes don’t push outward, holding the rim at bay, like it might seem. Rather, the rim is evenly pulled inward by spokes that are laced through the hub, the center part of the wheel that rotates around the axle, which makes it extraordinarily strong. These spokes coming from the hub then radiate outward to the rim, where they attach to nipples, which are almost like little nuts resting in the rim. The nipples can be screwed down onto threaded tips of the spokes, which increases tension on the rim, and also pulls it slightly to the left or right.

When are wheels not true?

No, its not when they’re lying to you… its when they’re not straight. A true wheel is rounder, centered, easier to pedal and they wobble less.

Thus knowing how to make a wheel perfectly round, replacing broken spokes and damaged nipples and fixing damaged rims can be quite important for keeping a bicycle in tip-top shape.

A lot of the tasks required to true a wheel require tools only found in a well-equipped bicycle shop (like a truing stand), so you will likely need to contact a local bicycle mechanic.

The information are taken from About.com and the Bike Mechanic

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Rido saddles are for women too!

September 24, 2011 3 comments

Below is an extract from Rido. The Rido LT is on its way and will hit  authorised dealers soon ( MBS is one of them)

“10/10″

“I have had the (RIDO R2) saddle since last Friday….  Well…. ya aint getting it back!
I am slim in the bum department, and find any hard surface uncomfortable to sit on. The surface of this saddle is ideal not too soft to cause pressure points and loss of energy and not too hard that you get a whack in the nerve and bone department on every lump on the road.

“Firstly when the saddle arrived, I was surprised at its weight, lighter than the Brookes I currently use. I was sceptical of it at first. I have to be, I have tried at least 18 different saddles with the Brookes out on top, and now after 80 miles, even that saddle causes me pain. (Sit bone pain, physical sit bone bruising and swelling, as well as skin pinches and blisters).”

Test:

“Best test has been to ride into work on the RIDO 2, in jeans, dont bother with my usual Assos cycling shorts, that would tell me a lot about the saddle… And it did. Total comfort. I even sat hard as the bike took me over tramlines, rutted old potholes that I usually avoid as I worry about rim damage, but this was a test after all. 10/10. 
Its great not to have to conform to the usual cycle clothes when cycling a 12 mile round trip each day.

“Today, I cycled a 50 mile tootle.  Wearing cycle leggings this time.   It was great to be thinking about the day, the views and where my next Audax ride was to be, rather than cycling with one leg down on the pedal, and one cheek held aloft, as the bike juttered over lumpy roads and cattle grids. I am very impressed. So much so, that next weekend I have an Audax to do. If this saddle comes up trumphs again (expecting it will), I intend to order another 4. One for hubby, and one for each of my other bicycles.

“There are always some negatives…. These are very much insignificant to the improvements made by the RIDO 2 saddle.  
Namely: it’s a bit ugly…  (sorry about that bit).
I wish the nose was shorter as it does rub a bit against my legs, but hoping that by dropping it a bit more, this may be reduced.
Frankly thats all I can say about the negatives, but boy who really cares about them anyway!

“When I have completed my Audax next weekend, I intent to review this saddle on the cycle blog I write to. I will send you the link to it when its live.
SOOOOooooo pleased I took the plunge on this one!” 

Mary Jane Watson, UK

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“I am a female cyclist…… I have not had a minute’s discomfort on the (RIDO) saddle”

“I am a female cyclist who commutes 40km per day to work and also goes cycle touring once or twice a year for a month at a time. It is difficult to find a comfortable saddle and this is compounded by a medical condition I have which is aggravated by any friction in this area. I have tried my fare share of so-called “female specific saddles” and have found them unremarkable. The only saddle that I have found comfortable is a Hamock Saddle,  a South African designed and manufactured female-specific saddle which looks a little like a uni-cycle saddle. As these aren’t made any longer I was trying to “make it last” but it had started to fall apart and I had to start looking for a replacement – breaking a saddle cycling to work is one thing, but when cycle touring it’s a deal breaker!”
“I spotted the Rido while trawling through pages of saddles on the SJS Website and it immediately made sense. The price is excellent – it encourages you to take the chance as it is affordable. Also, the write ups and reviews were great. I have not had a minute’s discomfort on the saddle and I’ve been riding up to 270km per week. I have ordered a second for an upcoming cycle tour to New Zealand in November and can’t wait to tour on it.

Thanks for an excellent product!”
…………………………………….

“I ordered a second Rido saddle for cycle touring and wanted to make it a priority to send you some feedback.

We spent 3 weeks cycling in New Zealand, much of that time on gravel surfaces of varying quality. In total we cycled aproximately 900km and I did not have one moment of discomfort on my new Rido saddle. The length of our days varied from 50-100km, with bikes fully loaded.

At the very least one would usually get some sort of pressure pain, however I did not experience anything of the sort which I had come to expect on other saddles I’ve toured on.
I am so happy to have found the perfect saddle! I think that when with all the variables in bicycle equipment the saddle makes the most difference and Rido offers a brilliant, high quality and affordable option. I recommend it to other cyclists – people would ride more if they were more comfortable. Thanks!”

J.S (Ms), Perth, Western Australia

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“A lifesaver!”

 “New kit – ….. uber-comfy Rido R2 saddle! I want to applaud the makers of the Rido saddle from the bottom of my heart and the heart of my bottom; a lifesaver!!”

H.D (Ms), Downton, Wiltshire, UK

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“The big grin was instant”
“A thorough endorsement from a lady. This one in particular was sufferring almost unrideable lady problems on a previous saddle. I put the R2 on for her, straight after a ride when things were at their worst, and the big grin was instant. Did 7 hours the day after with no ill effects. Winner!”

 S.M, Cardiff, Wales, UK (http://1000milesofsmiles.blogspot.com/)

Have you book yours (Rido LT) today?

LATEST – now 8 speed Freewheel design. April 2011 original post: Flamingo London NX7 gets transformed to a lightweight commuter! Want one?

13 Oct 2013: Latest update is that we will be including wheelsets from Wheelsport for Q4 2013 for the V8! This is the mass production of everything we understand about this model. Together with Wheelsport and MIT Cycle, we are proud to release the V8!  Weight is now a decent 11kg 8 speed freewheel design.

WheelsportMITCyclesmbs-logo.jpg

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Original  POST was April 2011

Flamingo bikes, folding bike brand from Taiwan have been gaining fans in Singapore and while often misbranded as a follower, people who ride them can tell you they are fast, they do not exhibit flex and they have exceptional value for the money you pay.

Contrary to common misperception, Flamingo has many firsts; they were the first to adopt hydroforming technology on their frames (this allows bike designers to make the frame longer yet stiffer) and innovations that ensure that your bike do not come apart as you go over a hill or bump AND hole extrusions that allow you to hide your cables inside the bike frame ( Do not have to deal with messy cable ties and cable eyelets.

We have seen an increase in the uptake of all models especially the HSF1 AND London NX7 and we are very pleased to help existing Flamingo owners here a chance to consider an upgrade that helps you TRANSFORM your Flamingo into a lean mean lightweight machine!

This post focuses on the London NX series

The current London NX7 – 16 inch wheels, 7 speed hub that is virtually maintenance free, you can push it around and its compact after you fold it and for short commutes around the city and it folds fast. BUT  it is relatively heavy due to the 7 speed hub from Shimano.  Any foldable bikes using a 7 speed Shimano hub will expect the bike to weigh at least 13kg or more.

Here comes the London 2L!

What did we do? Well for starters we reduced the weight! We shaved off almost 2kg  by swapping out the hub from 7 speed to single speed. C’mon for city commuting you  do not need 7 speeds. Next we changed the wheelsets and drive train and we could save a further 1kg. At the same time we did not want to blow your budget, so here is the goods news – a basic kit will cost anything bewteen S$500 to S$600 where we will mod the London NX7  to a London 2L – “L” stands for lightweight and “2” for Dual front chain ring.  If for some reason you want to take this bike for a century ride, the larger front chainring will help you overcome the downhills or flats. Bigger roller wheel to help you roll better if you push the bike very often.

So no need to buy that second bike that has similar design, be eco, be green just upgrade your existing bike!

Below are pictures of the mods.

 

This mod Flamingo 2L weighs in about 10.2kg

Foods that help cut the flab – a collection of suggestions and ideas

February 2, 2011 Comments off

Remember a post we did that exercise is good but watch what you eat too?

While cycling, we see so many put hard work and effort into that huffing and puffing, running and jogging and cycling – all in the hope of losing fat and to look trim and fit. I cannot help feel that many of us (especially me) diet, watch our intake of calories, cycle, exercise but still we JUST cannot lose that fat! Most of the runners and joggers in Singaporehave got high body fat. It could be the easy acess to food and also our sedentary lifestyles,  genes play a role too. So here is what many are advocating:

Eat the stuff that puts your metabolism on high speed to burn  calories.

Cinnamon Without going into the whole scientific explanation of why it works, adding 1/4 to 1 teaspoon of this spice to something you eat every day — hot cereal, marinades, yogurt — helps blood sugar get into cells to be used for energy, so less is stored as fat.

Green Tea One ingredient, caffeine, is a stimulant that raises your heart rate and compels your system to burn calories faster. Plus, green tea has catechins, substances that some experts believe help burn belly fat. Aim for three cups a day.

Coffee Again, the caffeine kicks your metabolism into high gear. Caffeine also jump-starts lipolysis, the breakdown of fat. One to two cups a day is ideal. Related: Cut the sugar! It’s time to say no to sugar. If you are a coffee addict, remember the more coffee you drink, the more sugar you consume. The best way is to cut down on sugar wherever possible. Avoid beverages high on sugar content, coffee or tea.

Chicken and Fish It actually takes energy to digest food, and your body burns more calories digesting and metabolizing protein than it does while breaking down carbs and fats. Translation: Consuming a few servings of lean protein, such as chicken, fish, and tofu, each day may help keep your metabolism revving away long after you finish eating your meal.

Yogurt Yeah, dairy has a bad rep for high calories, but yogurt, both the low-fat and regular kinds, contains probiotics: “friendly” bacteria that preliminary research suggests may actually help reduce the amount of fat your body absorbs. 

It is very surprising to know that there are certain foods help us shed off the flab. If you’re finding it difficult to get rid of belly fat,  try eating these-avocado, olive oil, blueberries, almonds and brown rice have the potential to cut body flab.

Chilli Pepper Often found in high quantities in hot salsa as well as in many Thai, Indian, and Chinese curry dishes, these wonder foods are packed with a metabolism-boosting compound called capsaicin, which provides chilli peppers’ fiery flavor. In addition, capsaicin increases your body temperature somewhat, giving your metabolism an extra calorie-burning push.

Nuts. Eat a handful of nuts (say six walnuts, or 10 almonds, or 15 peanuts) if the urge to snack hits you between meals. researchers claim that within 20 minutes, your hunger pangs will subside. Nuts are high on good quality protein and good fats (yes, there really is such a thing).

Walk and Climb Those Stairs
Add activity into your daily routine instead of waiting for the day when you will finally join the gym. Simple things, like washing your car yourself, mopping the floors, walking to the grocery store or walking up five flights to work, etc, can help you be much fitter—and slimmer.

Add More Fibre To Your Diet
Sprinkle flax on your cereal, as high-fibre flaxseed can help rein in the desire to eat. Add it to yogurt or cereal or even cake mix. Fibre aids digestion and makes you feel full for longer. But adding fibre to your diet is best done gradually, unless you want to end up with unfavourable side effects, like bloating.

Beware The Dressing On Salads
When you go out for lunch and make the sane decision of picking a great salad, see your positive choice through—don’t pick a salad that comes with a hefty dose of oil-based dressing. Instead, order your dressing on the side, dip your fork into the dressing, then skewer a forkful of salad. You’ll be surprised at how this tastes just right, and how little dressing you’ll use.

Maintain A Food Diary
Record your meals for a few days, every single bite you take. This helps understand your ‘danger periods’ (all those evenings spent munching in front of the TV), and your danger foods (those chocolate cookies!). Once you’ve identified the culprits, find specific ways to curb those cravings.

Deep Breathing Can Help
Hate looking at your abs, or whatever that is that passes for your abs? Take a deep breath and suck in your stomach for a few seconds. Repeat the action 10 times. Do it as often as you can. You’ll see inches from your middle disappear soon enough.

Don’t Binge Under Stress
A habit prompts the body to store fat in preparation for possible starvation, just what you are trying to avoid. To counter bingeing, try yoga, meditation, or a few simple breathing exercises that take only a few minutes to do but are very effective at combating stress.

A Little Less Alcohol
Go easy on the alcohol, as it’s a major source of calories. And cocktails pack even bigger caloric punches. The biggest offenders are, of course, creamy cocktails—these are in fact almost equivalent to drinking a rich dessert. If you’re trying to lose weight, stick to water or a simple nimbu pani. If you must drink alcohol, pick the simplest ones, and dilute a small amount of alcohol with a mixer—a small amount of gin witha hefty dose of tonic water is far better than a fruity cocktail.

Don’t Confuse Thirst For Hunger
Always grab a bottle of water when stepping out of the house. Reach for that when you’re out shopping and feel thirsty, or when the first hunger pangs strike—often what you mistake for hunger is actually thirst. So the next time inexplicable hunger assails you, reach for water first, as drinking that also helps you feel full. 

Weigh yourself daily. The best way to keep a check on your weight is to weigh yourself daily. This will help you know when you’re piling the extra pounds and how to modify your diet and regimen accordingly. Weigh yourself to know when you can and when you lose.

This is the most important rule for slimming. Never eat in front of your television. Snacking in front of the TV makes us eat more than usual without even realizing. Whenever you are eating out, try carrying a small calorie chart along to know the calorie contents.

Cycling tips #1: Crazyguyonabike – Useful site for folks planning to travel with their bicycle(s)

January 31, 2011 Comments off

Hi everyone,

This year, our team decided that we would try to scour and scout around what useful sites, trends and information that might be of interest to you the cyclist. No brand bashing, just stuff that you might find helpful for your cycling/foldable fix!

Here’s the first of our monthlies(Haha if there is such a word): Travelling with bicycles.

We have been selling the Extrawheel Trailer to serious Trekkers on bikes and they have stories to tell.

More and more people contemplating doing holiday trips with their bicycles.  A regular of ours was at the shop and mention this URL that is a nonproft neutral website for everything about travelling on a bicycle. It has contacts, journals and tips for anyone planning to take their bike on a trip. The site has won an aware for adventure.

Neil Gunton did his 114 day ride across USA covering more than 8400km and his journal started it all. Reminds me of the movie Forrest Gump when he decided to just keep running…

www.crazyguyonabike.com

Author has posted 5,331 journals and articles, with 712,135 pictures

Bike Friday has a nice Trailer that is made out of a suitcase that you can pull along after you unfold the bike.

Of course we have our own pool of people who have taken their Dahon Vitesse P18s to South America

Speed TRs throughout Asia (12000km and had only one flat tire!) www.asiawheeling.com and

Airnimal Chameleons to the Himalaya/Saudi desert.

Audax Australia on a Dahon Tournado.

Touring in hilly Hong Kong Shekou

Aeon keeping up with a Bike Friday in Laos/Cambodia

Is your adventure unfolding?

 

 

Bike Friday – 100% USA assembled foldable bike and has a very unique range too

December 26, 2010 Comments off

My Bike Shop started managing Bike Friday in June 2010 and since then we have sold more than a dozen of these USA assembled bikes.  While many will agree that the 16 inch Tikit wins hands down for fast folding (Hyperfold) and the ideal bike for commuting/travel companion ( It is designed to fit a samsonite bag, with handle grips and canvas straps for easy handling), the ride is very good for 16 inch wheeled foldie. There are still the uninformed who believe that foldies are not serious cyclists, many have experienced the performance and fun one can have with a foldable ( at least we can still get on the train/buses on restricted hours and keep our bikes in the home and the car when it rains LoL).  Oh well you cannot win them all.:)

Watched an episode of America’s got Talent and it showed a young guy who has epilepsy fly his 4 wire kite with so much grace and timing to Sarah Mclachlan’s hit  – Angel. Do not have the Youtube of the guy in that episode of America’s Got Talent but has Sarah Mclachlan’s beautiful song.

  America despite their ups and downs always gives everyone a chance to fulfill their dreams.

We thought we  share with you Bike Friday’s extended foldable bike range for families with special needs  http://bikefriday.com/specialneeds.  

We have brought in one Family Tandem just incase you want to try it out. It’s the perfect bicycle to bring physically( hearing, visual)  impaired,  persons with autism, those who have a fear of cycling or who cannot cycle, Maybe consider a fodlable Tandem and help them to experience what cycling is about.  Happy Boxing Day!

Cycling Myth Buster #6 Crank lengths – is longer better?

November 30, 2010 Comments off

LoL don’t worry, this is not a R(A) article about length but about crank arms of what you are riding.  We came across several Bike fitting sites, books and they offer some information on Hip Angles and Knee Angles. Thanks to all the articles that cover this.

Most crank lengths are available in 170 and 175mm lengths. This is fine if your inside-leg measurements is on  the long side of average, otherwise it can reduce pedalling efficiency.

Cranks that are too short do not allow the full leverage of the legs to be used, those that are too long force the knee, hip and ankle to bend more often resulting in slow cadence.

 Extracted from Bike Dynamics  & The Racing Guide by Haynes

Indicators your cranks are too long.

You are the first to get out of the saddle when climbing in a group.
You feel your upper body bobbing?vertically when spinning fast and lightly loaded.
Your transmission occasionally clangs?as you hit a dead spot at the top of the stroke.
Your knees / hips hurt.
Your knees come uncomfortably close to your chest when on the drops or tri bars.

Indicators your cranks are too short.

You feel strong on hills but seem to struggle on the flats.

A good guide is to apply 20-21% of your inside-leg measurement but bear in mind your saddle height plays a role.  As a guide:

Inside leg measurement(cm)           Crank length(mm)

72-75                                                         155 – 160

76-79                                                         160-165

80-83                                                         165-170

84-87                                                         170-175

88-91                                                          175- 180

92- 95                                                         180-185

After that, adjust your saddle position and see if you can get into the “zone”. Minimum knee angles should exceed 70° to avoid any discomfort issues. It has been captured over time and measurements that  really fast, powerful people have tended to be in a range around 75°.  So anything within the “zone” 74°-77° is ideal.

So for those who want to get optimum knee angles for power, shorter cranks may be the answer to help you achieve that ideal angle but not too short or you lose the leverage on straights… Still with me?

If you really want to see if you are within that angle for the knee, com eby my Bike Shop. We done simple jig that can quickly measure your angular displacement. It’s FREE OF CHARGE – only for MBS members.

 

BTW, we will take a break for the Cycling Myth Buster series till Jan 2011! Hope you enjoyed this segment and if you do, send us your comments and let us know what you like or dislike and what other topics you want to see.

Team will be taking a well deserved break for December 2010. Have a blessed Christmas and a Happy New Year – from the MBS Cycling Myth Busters team

Limited Edition bikes at MBS – Hard Rock style memorabilia?

November 25, 2010 Comments off

With the wide space of more than 1500 sq ft of retail space, 7 brands, various folding systems and more than 40 models of foldable bikes (Prices range between S$255 to S$22k) to choose from, customers get to view, ask, understand, touch and trial folding bikes of different systems and wheel sizes.  A few may have started to notice that My Bike Shop has a very special section(s) where our limited edition bikes that represent the pedigree of the brands we carry. We are  trying to restore a 15 year old Dahon to add to our collection.  Hopefully we do not take too long and we can add that to our collection.

We thought we list them here so that you might want to come and see the real deal.

Dahon Hon Solo – Single speed Dahon designed with old style designs. The desire to have a classically styled bike in the line, but it’s really more than that, it’s about lines, colors, graphics, a balance that’s hard to achieve. A bike you’d want to be seen on when cruising to your local barista. Also the selection of retro components (Brooks, Sugino, Nitto Moustache, Suzue) are inspired by Grant Petersen of Rivendell.   Only 500 made globally for 2006

Dahon Mu XXV – In celebration of the their 25th year in folding bikes. Since 1983, Dahon introduced the very first Dahon folder. Twenty five years and over 2.5 million bicycles later, Dahon celebrates a quarter century of championing the cause of green mobility. In commemoration, Dahon has created the Mμ XXV, a Limited Edition bicycle that represents the state of the art in folding bicycle technology. Specially crafted to weight 8.05 kg (17.71 lbs) w/o pedals. This limited edition is a Dahon dream bike. The initial plan was for a Magnesium frame but the welding was just too difficult. Only 250 made globally for 2009.

Dahon Kukuxumusu -  Kukuxumusu, which means “the kiss of the flea” in the Basque language, is best known for its expressive and irreverent designs especially those of the running if the bulls of San Fermin. The company’s designs can be on T-shirts, and a select ranges of consumer products around the world. Dahon produced 1,000 sets of the limited edition bicycle for 2009 .  This special bike was available in: Spain, the United States, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Germany, The Netherlands, Hong Kong, Israel, Italy, Poland, Portugal, Singapore, South Korea and Taiwan. Look carefully and you will see naughty stuff being done by the sheep.

Dahon Matrix 2007 - used and autographed signed by Star Awards 2006 Best Supporting Actor nominee Adam Chen in the Drama Serial – “萤火虫的梦”. Felicia rode the Vitesse D7 but did not signed the bike.

Guess her PR manager felt that her signature was worth alot of money although she was willing to do it. Oh well..she has left Mediacorp to pursue studies.

Dahon Speed TR – the original 1 of 2 Speed TRs that covered 12,000 km, over everything from crumbling mountain roads to giant intercity highways. You can read more about their adventures and see pictures and videos from the journey at www.AsiaWheeling.com. AsiaWheeling comprises a ten month long journey on folding bicycles, spanning the vastness of Asia, from the South Pacific, to India, the Middle east, Central Asia, Siberia, and East Asia. On the trip Scott and Woody explored over 100 cities, and 23 countries on their Speed TRs, folding up the bikes to travel between cities by rail, road, sea, and air. They only had 1 flat tire!! How is that for those who use Schwalbe and especially the Big Apples.

 Alex Moulton 50 - The Limited Edition Moulton50 celebrates 50 years of Moulton bicycles. The beautiful simplicity of the Sachs Duomatic 2-speed coaster brake rear hub coupled with the novel Speed-Drive 2-speed chainwheel give a range of 4 speeds without bar shifters or cabling. Made for 2010. There were only 50 made and unlikely you can get any owner to sell you his Moulton 50.

When you get some time or if you are waiting for your bike to be serviced, grab a cuppa, move around and view these “special” folding bikes. There are also the Moulton NS Stainless Steel seperable bikes that took a year of craftsmenship to build them up. Cannot wait to get to see the Moulton NS Double Pylon, the prestigious top folding/mini velos in the world! We promise you will enjoy the finishing and the fine machining for components and the flawless welding of stainless steel in a lattice design frame and the front suspension is an engineering feat. No wonder the TSR owners realised what they have when they ride the Moulton TSRs.

Last but not least, we have a customer who has ordered the Bike Friday SuperPro! This S$10k titanium bike from the Bike Friday, the only 100% USA assembled folding bike manufacturer since 1992 has unleased a lightest production bike.  Only 6.9kg and fully customised with the choicest components.

Singaporeans and their love for folding bikes is starting to really hot up! You will start to see very exclusive  folding bikes (ranged and sold through My Bike Shop of course) being ridden around in Singapore soon. Funny thing is – most of them are White!  Enjoy the slideshow

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