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Caution – Fraudulent site and persons representing My Bike Shop SG business

Fraud Alert

Dear all, it has been brought to our attention that person(s) and parties have misrepresented themselves as My Bike Shop SG outlets,  impersonated staff emails and even owners of the business. They have been found using unauthorised use of names, logos and images of our branches. We like to highlight that the brands of bike brands that we sell  are found on authorised web/blog pages  www.mybikeshop.com.sg or our facebook page https://www.facebook.com/MyBikeShop.

My Bike Shop Outlets are  GST registered and ACRA listed. Please check before you complete any purchase and do not provide credit card details or personal details online. If in doubt, please call us at 67757133 or 66941750 or email us at checkmybikeshop@gmail.com so it is recommended that you check before releasing personal details and credit card information to the site.

The relevant authorities have been alerted but we have been advised to post up an alert. The illegal site has been closed down and if you do find any of such phishing and fraud sites, please notify us at checkmybikeshop@gmail.com

 

Bigfish folding bikes – exclusively at My Bike Shop SG Outlets

Bigfish logo smallBigfish Folding Bike’s unique Smart Folding Technology makes folding your bike easy – without having to remember a specific order of doing things. It’s so easy! No latches, catches or screws, or having to be in a certain gear before you start … Four quick steps are all it takes to get on the road or to pack it away. A simple push and pull of the buttons is all it takes. Fold it – then wheel it

To make your Bigfish properly mobile when folded, we designed it so you can wheel it along with you as you walk. Some people wheel it upright some pull it like a trolley. Have a try and see what suits you best. Comfortable as a city bike.  Practical as a folding bike.

http://www.youtube.com/user/bigfishbike?gl=SG&hl=en-GB

mbs-logo.jpg Introducing the Bigfish LINE series

BFL NEXUS 3 BLACK folded.jpg

Beautifully designed, 16 inch wheeled folding bicycle –  compact, fast to fold, easy to wheel, fantastic to ride.

You’ll never know a simpler fold

Bigfish’s unique Smart Folding Technology means no prescribed folding order. It’s so easy! No latches, catches or screws, no having to be in a certain gear beforehand … Four quick steps are all you need to get on the road or to pack it away.

A simple push and pull of the buttons is all it takes.

Fold it – then wheel it

To make your Bigfish properly mobile when folded, it has been designed so you can wheel it along with you as you walk. Some people wheel it upright some pull it like a trolley. Have a try and see what suits you best.

Store it inside, safe and dry

Whatever the weather, Bigfish stays safe and protected. In your apartment, office or car, it keeps bike thieves empty-handed, saving the pain and cost of replacing your bike, while it keeps rust and rain damage at bay.

Ready in your
car boot

Why not just keep it in the car? You can quite comfortably fit two Bigfish in the boot of most compact cars, ready for your next big adventure! (Or at least for when the traffic turns to a standstill)

Introducing the Bigfish E-Bike

Bigfish Line+ E Bike combines the new Smart Folding Technology with the powerful pedal assistance. The Japanese Line_4787293engineered high quality crank-drive system with torque sensing mechanism (constantly) provide smooth and leading-edge performance. Li-ion battery with smart battery charger ensures long lasting ride and easy charging.

Line+E.  Powerful. Lightweight. Portable.

At 18 kgs, this is one of the lightest crank-drive system e-bikes on the market.  Bigfish Line+ E combines the new Smart Folding Technology with powerful pedal assistance. The Japanese engineered high quality crank-drive system with torque sensing mechanism (constantly) provides smooth and leading-edge performance. Li-ion battery with smart battery charger ensures a long lasting ride and easy charging.

bikeCntImg2b bikeCntImg2c

Cycling and its benefits – full article from Cycling Plus

November 25, 2013 Comments off

MBS tooMBS shop frontage

Whether young, old, couples, families or retirees, we have helped many Singaporeans rediscover the many benefits of cycling in a convenient, comfortable and safe manner.  (We sell the widest range of the leading folding bike brands and always advise our customers on the right fit and safety gear like helmets and lights).

30 reasons to take up cycling 

Extracted from the full article by Matthew Barbour, Cycling Plus | Tuesday, October 1, 2013 9.30am

1. You’ll get there faster dahon

2. Sleep more deeply

3. Look younger

4. Boost your bowels

5. Increase your brain power 

 6. Beat illness RDC_7663

7. Live longer

8. Save the planet

9. Improve your sex life

10. It’s good breedingtikit-boat

11. Heal your heart

12. Your boss will love you

13. Cycle away from the big C

14. Lose weight in the saddle

15. You’ll make more money

16. Avoid pollution

17. Enjoy healthy family timeimages

18. It means guilt-free snacks

19. Get better at any sport

20. Make creative breakthroughs

21. You’re helping others

22. You can get fit without trying too hard

23. Boost your bellows8may1

24. Burn more fat

25. You’re developing a positive addiction

26. Get (a legal) highRDC_7519

27. Make friends and stay healthy

28. Be happy 

29. Feeling tired? Go for a ride

30. Spend quality time with your partner

 

 

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Clearance stock of Rippleboards from Street surfing now at only S$39.00

October 14, 2013 Comments off

Selling for only S$39. We found a box of Street Surfing Rippleboards. The Ripple is designed for kids up to 12 years

old.

51hGKaf7U5L._SX385_

The Ripple is smaller and lighter then the original wave board, making it easier for the little people with little legs to experience the thrill of surfing the streets. The stance from deck to deck is closer together making this board the perfect pick for youngsters. The original Rippleboard from Street Surfing! Sold as it is. Highly recommended that kids wear helmets, elbow guards and wristguards. Call outlets before coming down. Final clearance

 

rippleboard ripple unbranded-street-surfing--the-wave-ripple-board

Launching a pilot online reservation system for services

October 13, 2013 Comments off

MBS Service Select

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please take some time to review the Booking Calender http://mybikeshopoutlets.simplybook.me/index/about  for our Shop services* Here on weekdays you can book and ensure that your bike will be worked on with priority. Booking ensures that you get priority when you turn up on time.

 

RD FDBasic Tune up/Adjustments

Short synopsis: This is for the basic adjustments that require retuning due to normal use and within the first 500km or 3 months whichever happens first. Areas we check are Chain, brake adjustment and smooth out shifting. Does not cover wear and tear OR abuse of components. These time slots are designated for basic components upgrade like Chainrings, stems, pedals and wheeslets

Full servicing

Short synopsis: This service is a full service where bearings are removed and necessary cables are adjustments are done. Maximum 10 working days turnaround The royal treatment – comprehensive service that ensures that all bearings and moving parts are clean, lubricated, adjusted correctly and working effectively. This is recommended for bikes that are used daily over a long period

Parts upgradeBike Upgrades advice

Short synopsis: This is for our MBS customers who to upgrade their bikes for better performance. Will help if you can understand what you are achieving in terms of speed and distance.Knowing your budget is essential. A knowledgeable technical person will be assigned to assist you. Full 45 minutes will be spent discussing and a proposed list of upgrade will be furnished.

bike_setupBike setups

Sitting correctly with the appropriate reach and angle displacement is key to reducing discomfort and injuries. It also ensures that you maximise your cycling benefits.

 

 

 

We are trialling the booking system to allow these services to be done on a booking basis. If you do book, we will ensure that the Mechanics and Technical advisors will be available to work on your bike first.

 

 

 

A comparison of hub-driven gears: SRAM Dual-drive 27 vs. Sturmey Archer CS-RF3

May 5, 2013 2 comments
Sturmey archer CS-RF3

Sturmey archer CS-RF3

Bikes fitted with hub-driven gears are becoming increasing popular. They provide for many miles of maintenance-free biking plus the shifting is smooth and silent. The use of internal hub gear systems allow cyclists to conveniently shift their gears while stationary.

Sram DualDrive 27

Sram DualDrive 27

A good example would be dropping to a lighter set of gears while waiting at the traffic junction. Urban or touring bikes are being fitted with internal hub gear systems like the SRAM Dual-Drive or the Sturmey Archer CS-RF3 system.

SRAM Dual-Drive 27 Sturmey Archer CS-RF3
  1. Easy and precise shifting
  1. Lethargic shifting
 2. Easy indexing of 3-speed hub gear  2. Harder to index
 3. SRAM DD27 only weighs only 970g (freewheel)  3. CS-RF3 (27 speed) weighs in at 1090g (freewheel)
 4. Better gear ratio; Overall gear range of 186%:Gear 1 : 73%

Gear 2: 100%

Gear 3: 136%

 4. Overall gear range of 170%
Gear 1 : 75%Gear 2: 100%

Gear 3:133%

 5. Shifting mechanisms are enclosed  5. Shifting cables are exposed
 6. Click-box shifting cable is easily removed  6. Cable removal poses some challenge
 7. Has been deployed for many years without issues of gear slippage  7. Had an old batch of gear slipping issues

In addition, the SRAM Dualdrive system actually weighs in lighter (250g less) than a standard derailleur drive train system. Based on the feedback of various customers, overall the SRAM Dualdrive system seems to be the more reliable and lighter hub gear system you would want to use on your bike.

My Bike shop is very pleased and honored to work with Mr Brown and his travels again

October 28, 2012 Comments off

Mr Brown who worked with us and his crew partner brought a Bike Friday Tikit and Tern Link P9 to Taiwan travelled safely despite the Bike Friday Tikit Safety warning. Nonetheless we took steps to ensure that his bike was inspected and he is off AGAIN

Cross post from Mr Brown:

I am leaving for the U.S. next week to speak and meet up with overseas Singaporeans at Ann Arbor (Wednesday, 24th Oct), Chicago (Friday, 26th October) and Seattle (Saturday, 27th October). Click on the dates for details.

The Overseas Singaporean Unit also interviewed me for their website (where I stole this photo from). You can read it on their site.

I will also be doing some cycling in the three cities on my Bike Friday Tikit (thanks to sponsor My Bike Shop) and I will share my cycling experiences too.

See you all in America next week!

P.S. This is the SECOND time I’ve gone to the U.S. during an election. The last time I was there was Obama vs McCain during September/October 2008. Haha!

Ten lessons from the great cycling cities.

August 22, 2012 Comments off
Found another recent posts on great cycling cities. There are MANY examples from other cities, I hope the task force will look into these word class examples. many countries have got it righ!
Cross-posted from Sightline Daily.
In the Seattle suburb where I grew up, the main transportation choice most residents face is what kind of car to buy. I moved to the city after college and, inspired by the “car-lite” lifestyles of several friends, decided to give cycling a try.I fell in love with it. Urban cycling freed me from slow buses, parking meters, and mind-numbing elliptical machines. I arrived at work with more energy. I lost weight. I discovered charming neighborhood restaurants. I could smell fresh laundry and dinners in the oven while I pedaled home through residential streets. Getting from A to B on my bike became the best part of my day.Recently, I won a fellowship and got to spend six months living life on two wheels in the world’s most bike-friendly cities. I brought home 10 lessons for us here in the States:A bike lane in Denmark. (Photo by Christine Grant.)

1. It’s the infrastructure, stupid!

Amazing infrastructure makes cycling normal and safe in bike meccas. For example, parked cars to the left of the bike lane not only provide a barrier between motorized traffic and cyclists, they also minimize a cyclist’s chance of getting “doored.” Most cars only have one occupant, the driver, and drivers get out on the left.

Bikes move at different speeds than cars or pedestrians, so intersections are safer for cyclists if they have their own traffic signal rhythm. Cyclists in Copenhagen generally get a slight head start over cars so that they’ll be more visible as they cross the intersection.

2. Bike share!

Bike-share programs are sweeping the world, and they are very successful at boosting bike numbers.About 130,000 trips are made each day in Paris on public bikes thanks to the pioneering Vélib bike-share program.

Barcelona’s bike-share program has been wildly succesful at boosting ridership. (Photo by Christine Grant.)

In Barcelona, people used to point and stare if you were pedaling a bike, but in just a few years, a bike-share program called Bicing has changed that. Bicing started in 2007 and quickly tripled cycling trips in the city, according to Miquel Ruscalleda, who directs Barcelona’s cycling efforts. Currently 46 percent of the people you see on bikes in Barcelona are on bright red Bicing bikes.

Ruscalleda also reports that the “safety in numbers” phenomenon is working in his city. Cyclists had a .008 percent chance of being in a traffic accident in 2005, and the rate has dropped to around .005 percent presently.

3. It’s safer than a sofa.

Sedentary living doubles the risk of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and obesity. Combating diseases of sedentary living requires 30 minutes of moderate exercise every day — a minimum many people around the world are unable to meet. But almost 40 percent of Copenhagen residents meet their minimum exercise requirements by cycling to work or school.

Copenhagen’s Public Health Department calculates that even when accident costs are factored in, every mile of cycling translates to net health benefits worth $1.30. A recent public health campaign in Copenhagen reminded residents, “You’re safer on your bike than on the sofa!”

Barcelona’s bike counter. (Photo by Christine Grant.)

4. Say “thank you.”

Cyclists also save city governments money by reducing traffic congestion, stormwater run-off, air pollution, and road maintenance expenditures. Many cities are doing little things to show their gratitude.

Barcelona recently installed a counter on a main route displaying the time, temperature, bike count for the day, and progress toward the official annual ridership goal for that route.

Copenhagen has begun putting in footrests at intersections. They say, “Hi, cyclist! Rest your foot here … and thank you for cycling in the city!”

5. Turn streets into backyards.

Dutch road engineer Hans Monderman hated traffic signs in cities and towns. His reasoning was simple: Most drivers don’t look at signs. Speed bumps and stop signs also don’t do much because drivers are notorious for accelerating to “make up time” after each interruption.

Monderman redesigned Dutch towns so that drivers felt like they were passing through someone’s backyard. Monderman’s “backyard”plans called for street furniture — benches, picnic tables, sand boxes, pea patches, trees, flowerpots, and ping pong tables. Drivers either saw or sensed the presence of people and children, and basic social laws kicked in: It isn’t polite to speed through someone’s backyard.

Many residential streets throughout Europe now embody Monderman’s principles.

6. Let prices tell the truth.

Driving — and parking — is much more expensive in other parts of the world. Filling up a tank of gas in Japan will cost you about $7.25 per gallon, and gas prices in most European countries are also much higher than in the U.S.

Donald Shoup, an economist and the author of The High Cost of Free Parking says, “People who want to store their car shouldn’t store it on the most valuable land on the planet, for free.” Street parking is typically $4.50 per hour in European cities.

A woman in Kyoto bikes in heels. (Photo by Christine Grant.)

7. You don’t need “bike clothes.”

Most of the women and men I saw on bicycles throughout Europe and Japan didn’t wear special clothes. People just wore their usual outfits, heels and all.

Women from London to Tokyo looked beautiful, stylish, and feminine while they were cycling. Men frequently pedaled in suits. “Style over speed,” says Mikael Colville-Anderson, who started the Cycle Chic movement.

8. Electrify it.

A cargo bike with two kids and groceries can be hard to get up hills. That’s why many parents in hilly Zurich, Switzerland, use electric-assist bikes. They can also help people who are battling obesity or recovering from a heart attack. A bike shop owner I interviewed in Zurich makes custom electric-assist bicycles for disabled customers who would otherwise be dependent on public transportation.

For this mother and her daughters in Kyoto, biking is a family affair. (Photo by Christine Grant.)

9. Admit it: It’s emotional.

Smell and touch are the senses most linked to our emotions. In Europe and Japan, I spoke with dozens of urban cyclists who talked about the curious happiness derived from activating your senses and connecting with your city on a bicycle. One Amsterdam father’s voice actually cracked with emotion as he reflected on his morning and afternoon rides with his son. His toddler sat in a front-mounted childseat. The father talked about how nice it was to smell his son’s head during the commute to day care.

10. It’s a virtuous cycle.

“Cycling isn’t just a part of the Dutch DNA,” Marc van Woudenberg told me in Amsterdam, where 47 percent of residents make at least one trip per day on a bicycle.

The Dutch have the highest rates of utility cycling in the world because citizens have made it clear to politicians that cycling infrastructure is a priority. Better infrastructure recruits more people onto bikes, which creates more advocates for better infrastructure, which recruits more people onto bikes, and so on. Today, the Dutch continue to advocate for infrastructure that will facilitate cycling.

After six months on my bicycling wanderjahr, I’m inspired by all the creative ways cities are transforming themselves to meet the needs of the 21st century: low on carbon, high on physical activity, low on noise and danger, high on fun and style. Here in the U.S., we have exciting opportunities to join the world’s great bike cities and redefine urban transportation on two wheels.

Spokes – Spoken or Silent?

June 22, 2012 Comments off

Why Spokes Break

Bike spokes are a pretty simple part of your bike. They support your weight and transfer power from the hub to the wheel. Problems with spokes are pretty infrequent, but still do happen from time to time. The most common problem a cyclist will have with their spokes is the occasional broken spoke. This happened to me with some regularity as I’m what they used to call in boys’ jeans sizes, “husky.” You’ll just be going down the road and suddenly hear a noise like TWANGGG! (and it does sound like that). Even if you don’t hear the spoke break, you’ll likely feel it, because the your wheel will usually go all wobbly. Sometimes if you mash down particularly hard on the pedals or hit a pothole it can spur spoke breakage too, but usually it just kinda happens. Spokes break most frequently where the head of the spoke laces into the hub, because the curved head of the spoke is the weakest part and yet still has to bears a lot of the weight and force of power transfer. If you have this happen, stop, get off your bike and inspect your wheel. You want to make sure your spoke isn’t flopping around to where it can get entangled with your frame or chain as your wheel turns. To keep it secure, you can tape it to a neighbor or unscrew it from the nipple and remove it completely. You’re okay to ride it a bit longer if necessary to get home, but you don’t want another forty miles or continue riding days and days with a broken spoke if you can help it. It puts additional stress and strain on your other spokes (which can then cause them to break prematurely at some point down the road too) and can make your wheel go out of tru

How Spokes work?

How the spokes accomplish these terrific and heroic feats? First, spokes don’t push outward, holding the rim at bay, like it might seem. Rather, the rim is evenly pulled inward by spokes that are laced through the hub, the center part of the wheel that rotates around the axle, which makes it extraordinarily strong. These spokes coming from the hub then radiate outward to the rim, where they attach to nipples, which are almost like little nuts resting in the rim. The nipples can be screwed down onto threaded tips of the spokes, which increases tension on the rim, and also pulls it slightly to the left or right.

When are wheels not true?

No, its not when they’re lying to you… its when they’re not straight. A true wheel is rounder, centered, easier to pedal and they wobble less.

Thus knowing how to make a wheel perfectly round, replacing broken spokes and damaged nipples and fixing damaged rims can be quite important for keeping a bicycle in tip-top shape.

A lot of the tasks required to true a wheel require tools only found in a well-equipped bicycle shop (like a truing stand), so you will likely need to contact a local bicycle mechanic.

The information are taken from About.com and the Bike Mechanic

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Rido saddles are for women too!

September 24, 2011 3 comments

Below is an extract from Rido. The Rido LT is on its way and will hit  authorised dealers soon ( MBS is one of them)

“10/10″

“I have had the (RIDO R2) saddle since last Friday….  Well…. ya aint getting it back!
I am slim in the bum department, and find any hard surface uncomfortable to sit on. The surface of this saddle is ideal not too soft to cause pressure points and loss of energy and not too hard that you get a whack in the nerve and bone department on every lump on the road.

“Firstly when the saddle arrived, I was surprised at its weight, lighter than the Brookes I currently use. I was sceptical of it at first. I have to be, I have tried at least 18 different saddles with the Brookes out on top, and now after 80 miles, even that saddle causes me pain. (Sit bone pain, physical sit bone bruising and swelling, as well as skin pinches and blisters).”

Test:

“Best test has been to ride into work on the RIDO 2, in jeans, dont bother with my usual Assos cycling shorts, that would tell me a lot about the saddle… And it did. Total comfort. I even sat hard as the bike took me over tramlines, rutted old potholes that I usually avoid as I worry about rim damage, but this was a test after all. 10/10. 
Its great not to have to conform to the usual cycle clothes when cycling a 12 mile round trip each day.

“Today, I cycled a 50 mile tootle.  Wearing cycle leggings this time.   It was great to be thinking about the day, the views and where my next Audax ride was to be, rather than cycling with one leg down on the pedal, and one cheek held aloft, as the bike juttered over lumpy roads and cattle grids. I am very impressed. So much so, that next weekend I have an Audax to do. If this saddle comes up trumphs again (expecting it will), I intend to order another 4. One for hubby, and one for each of my other bicycles.

“There are always some negatives…. These are very much insignificant to the improvements made by the RIDO 2 saddle.  
Namely: it’s a bit ugly…  (sorry about that bit).
I wish the nose was shorter as it does rub a bit against my legs, but hoping that by dropping it a bit more, this may be reduced.
Frankly thats all I can say about the negatives, but boy who really cares about them anyway!

“When I have completed my Audax next weekend, I intent to review this saddle on the cycle blog I write to. I will send you the link to it when its live.
SOOOOooooo pleased I took the plunge on this one!” 

Mary Jane Watson, UK

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“I am a female cyclist…… I have not had a minute’s discomfort on the (RIDO) saddle”

“I am a female cyclist who commutes 40km per day to work and also goes cycle touring once or twice a year for a month at a time. It is difficult to find a comfortable saddle and this is compounded by a medical condition I have which is aggravated by any friction in this area. I have tried my fare share of so-called “female specific saddles” and have found them unremarkable. The only saddle that I have found comfortable is a Hamock Saddle,  a South African designed and manufactured female-specific saddle which looks a little like a uni-cycle saddle. As these aren’t made any longer I was trying to “make it last” but it had started to fall apart and I had to start looking for a replacement – breaking a saddle cycling to work is one thing, but when cycle touring it’s a deal breaker!”
“I spotted the Rido while trawling through pages of saddles on the SJS Website and it immediately made sense. The price is excellent – it encourages you to take the chance as it is affordable. Also, the write ups and reviews were great. I have not had a minute’s discomfort on the saddle and I’ve been riding up to 270km per week. I have ordered a second for an upcoming cycle tour to New Zealand in November and can’t wait to tour on it.

Thanks for an excellent product!”
…………………………………….

“I ordered a second Rido saddle for cycle touring and wanted to make it a priority to send you some feedback.

We spent 3 weeks cycling in New Zealand, much of that time on gravel surfaces of varying quality. In total we cycled aproximately 900km and I did not have one moment of discomfort on my new Rido saddle. The length of our days varied from 50-100km, with bikes fully loaded.

At the very least one would usually get some sort of pressure pain, however I did not experience anything of the sort which I had come to expect on other saddles I’ve toured on.
I am so happy to have found the perfect saddle! I think that when with all the variables in bicycle equipment the saddle makes the most difference and Rido offers a brilliant, high quality and affordable option. I recommend it to other cyclists – people would ride more if they were more comfortable. Thanks!”

J.S (Ms), Perth, Western Australia

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“A lifesaver!”

 “New kit – ….. uber-comfy Rido R2 saddle! I want to applaud the makers of the Rido saddle from the bottom of my heart and the heart of my bottom; a lifesaver!!”

H.D (Ms), Downton, Wiltshire, UK

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“The big grin was instant”
“A thorough endorsement from a lady. This one in particular was sufferring almost unrideable lady problems on a previous saddle. I put the R2 on for her, straight after a ride when things were at their worst, and the big grin was instant. Did 7 hours the day after with no ill effects. Winner!”

 S.M, Cardiff, Wales, UK (http://1000milesofsmiles.blogspot.com/)

Have you book yours (Rido LT) today?

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